Africa

From Cape Town and iconic Table Mountain in the south, to evocative Tangiers and exotic Casablanca in the north and the natural wonders of the islands of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean off the east coast, cruises to Africa are packed with culture, history and opportunities to see this captivating continent’s diverse wildlife.

Popular cruising ports of call include Durban, Cape Town & Port Elizabeth (South Africa), Walvis Bay (Namibia), Tangiers and Casablanca (Morocco), Tunis (Tunisia), and magnificent Madagascar, all of which are gateways to a whole host of unforgettable holiday experiences, some cruises incorporating land-based stays to ensure you have time to see the real Africa.

In such a vast continent incorporating 46 countries and wide variations in both latitude and longitude, the climate varies greatly depending on the area and the time of year you visit, so please check the details with your cruise specialist when making your enquiry. Evidence of vaccinations is likely to be needed for some ports of call; requirements change from time to time so it is recommended that you check on the NHS choices website or with your GP for up-to-date medical advice.

Call 01524 509 809 NOW for more information on cruises to Africa or email info@cruiseoffers.com.

  • Cape Town

    The capital of South Africa enjoys a stunning location in the ‘city bowl’, a natural amphitheatre by the coast, formed by mountains including the stunning Table Mountain. Take a cable car ride up Table Mountain for some incredible views. The climate here is Mediterranean-style, with mild, wet winters and warm, dry summers, perfect for growing vines, and many cruise operators offer excursions to Stellenbosch, the oldest settlement in South Africa where wine has been produced since the early 18th century. Cape Town is also renowned for the diversity of its flora - visit the Cape of Good Hope, part of Table Mountain National Park, or Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens. Look out also for excursions to Boulders Beach, where large granite boulders provide cover for observing endangered African penguins in their natural habitat. Visits to Robben Island, where Nelson Mandela was incarcerated for much of his prison term, are available with some companies.

    Table Mountain, Cape Town
  • Casablanca

    The most cosmopolitan of Morocco's cities, with a palpably French mood, but reflecting the paradox at the heart of Morocco - its unique fusion of ancient and modern, of Africa, Arabia and Europe. The beguiling Casablanca of Bergman and Bogart may be no more - but you'll still find endless interest and enigmas here amid busy boulevards and vibrant bazaars.

    Casablanca is Morocco’s largest city with a population of 2.6 million. Although it has a history going back several centuries and was colonized by the Portuguese who stayed until 1755, it declined into insignificance by the mid 1880’s. Its renaissance came with the French protectorate under its first resident general, Lyautey. It was he who decided to establish Casablanca as the administrative centre of the new protectorate and gave Casablanca its wide boulevards, public parks and fountains, and imposing Mauresque civic buildings. Look for the Hassan II Mosque, the gleaming, white medium highrise 1930’s architecture, the many Art-Deco touches and the pedestrian precincts thronged with speedy, fashion-conscious young people. From here, you can visit the Imperial City of Rabat, while magical Marrakech is within reach.

    Hassan II Mosque
  • Durban

    This is the leading beach resort in South Africa, with a subtropical climate and a vibrant, cosmopolitan atmosphere. The combination of African and Indian influences make for a delicious variety of cuisine. Excursions around the city are offered, or alternatively you may wish to try something a bit different and sample some Zulu culture. Visit the Valley of a Thousand Hills, one of KwaZulu Natal’s best-kept secrets, formed by the majestic uMngeni River and its tributaries. Here you can see Zulu dancing and cultural demonstrations, and perhaps even visit a Crocodile Farm and a Snake Park. In the Natal Midlands are the 95-metre Howick Falls, part of a series of rivers and cascades which dominate this region. The falls’ local name is KwaNoggaza, the ‘place of the tall one’, and is regarded with superstition by Zulus as it is said to be the place of the spirits of their ancestors. The views from the top of the falls are astounding, and some operators offer hikes along the Howick Falls Gorge Walk or other hiking trails.

    Umhlanga Pier, Durban
  • Madagascar

    The Avenue of the Baobabs
  • Port Elizabeth

    A charming city with a rich architectural heritage, most cruise companies will offer an escorted tour of the city. This part of the Eastern Cape is particularly rich is game reserves, and there is a wide range of day excursions available – a popular one is to Shamwari Game Reserve where you will be able to look out for the Big Five, though many other Reserves are offered too.

    Lighthouse in Port Elizabeth
  • Reunion

    Cascade of Grand Galet
  • Tangiers

    Overlooking a vast sweeping bay, Tangier is the traditional gateway to Morocco. Though no more than 15 miles across the Straits of Gibraltar from Europe, this is a cosmopolitan city that stands on the threshold of Africa. Its world of minarets and domes, ancient casbah (once the sultan's walled palace and gardens) and animated souks express the rich part-Arab, part-African heritage of the city.

    Originally settled by the ancient Greeks and Phoenicians, for whom it was a trading port, Tangier has been coveted for millennia as a strategic site for a fortress and has seen occupation by 12 nations since the 5th century. Tangier was taken in 1471 from the Arabs by the Portuguese and given to Charles II of England as part of the dowry of Catherine of Braganza; the English abandoned the city in 1684 to the Moors when it became the haunt of pirates. In 1912, Tangier was declared an international city but in 1929 Spain gained effective control until 1956.

    Tangier
  • Tunis

    Located on a protected bay off on the north east coast, Tunisia's lively capital reflects an intriguing fusion of two cultures. It's a city where 19th century French boulevards and cosmopolitan western-style shops and entertainments rub shoulders with Arab tradition - at its most exotic in the maze-like 13th century Medina of Moorish houses and souks that is amongst the best preserved of its kind in the Islamic world. The 8th century Great Mosque and several museums in town are worth a look including the Dar Ben Abdallah, housing a beautiful collection of costumes and the Bardo Museum, displaying a vibrant collection of Roman mosaics and tapestries. Also visit the Thermal Baths and the heights of Sidi Bu Said. The pretty village of Sidi Bou Said sits perched on a headland, wreathed in flowers. This typical Tunisian village is a picture of domes and balconies in dazzling blue and white, set against a sparkling sea.

    The Capital of Tunisia has a long history, once occupied by the Romans and the Byzantines. During the early 11th century, the town was ravaged by Islamic nomads, who built mosques and Moorish houses. During the late 19th century, the French declared a protectorate over Tunisia until the 1956 independence.

    Nearby are the poignant ruins of Carthage, the Phoenician city rebuilt by Julius Caesar and Augustus to become the third largest city of the Roman Empire. Dido was the legendary founder and queen of Carthage; the city was probably established as a trading post towards the end of the 9th century BC by Phoenicians. The earliest artefacts unearthed by archaeologists at the site date from 800 BC. Built on a peninsula jutting into the Gulf of Tunis, Carthage had two splendid harbours, connected by a canal. Above the harbours on a hill was the Byrsa, a walled fortress.

    The Medina of Tunis
  • Walvis Bay

    This is a laid-back sort of place with a nice calm atmosphere, where a relaxing drink and meal along the waterfront seems like exactly the right way to pass the time. For nature-lovers, the honey-coloured sand plains at Walvis Bay attract flamingos in their thousands as well as many other colourful bird species. Also nearby is the Namib-Naukluft Park, where you can experience the grandeur of the 1,000 foot sand dunes, Lawrence of Arabia-style, as well as seeing other habitats each supporting its own unique variety of plant and animal species. Also nearby is the famous Cape Cross Seal Reserve, home to up to 100,000 Cape fur seals.  

    Flamingos in Walvis Bay

Latest Africa Offers

Price Per Person (based on 2 adults sharing)

  • First latest offer

    Cape Town, South Africa

    18 January 2019 (2 nights)

    MSC Musica

    from £199.00pp

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  • First latest offer

    South Africa, Mozambique

    01 February 2019 (3 nights)

    MSC Musica

    from £229.00pp

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  • First latest offer

    South Africa, Mozambique

    04 February 2019 (4 nights)

    MSC Musica

    from £249.00pp

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  • First latest offer

    South Africa, Mozambique, South Africa

    11 February 2019 (4 nights)

    MSC Musica

    from £269.00pp

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  • First latest offer

    Cape Town, South Africa

    24 January 2019 (4 nights)

    MSC Musica

    from £289.00pp

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  • First latest offer

    Cape Town to Perth

    • Incentive 1 name

    19 January 2019 (16 nights)

    Queen Elizabeth

    from £1589.00pp

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  • First latest offer

    Arctic Norway and the Northern Lights

    12 February 2019 (15 nights)

    Saga Sapphire

    from £2249.00pp

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  • First latest offer

    Safaris, Sands & Splendors

    • Incentive 1 name

    20 January 2019 (30 nights)

    Nautica

    from £7689.00pp

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